David Bane

David Bane grew up in central Illinois on a diversified livestock and grain farm where he learned from his parents about great food and sustainable agriculture. After obtaining two doctoral degrees from the University of Illinois and the University of Minnesota, David worked as a private veterinary practitioner, an associate professor at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine, and a swine technical consultant for a pharmaceutical company. Eventually David was drawn back to his farming roots.


David and his wife, Susan, farm a small parcel of land in southeastern Champaign county. They decided about 17 years ago that the best use for the land was to produce the highest quality meat, poultry and eggs for their family and for neighboring families. Their farm has evolved since they began, but they continually strive to produce meat and poultry products in a sustainable environment with the health and welfare of the animals as the primary focus. They produce delicious, pasture-raised foods for their family and to the specifications of their customers with no antibiotics, no pesticides, no hormones, no synthetic additives and no GMO feeds. Visitors are always welcome to the farm. 

This Is A Great Life!

"There is no greater thrill than growing a product that customers absolutely love!"--David Bane, Bane Family Meats, Champaign County, IL

Welcome Back!

 

We're talking about catalyzing a farm to food system vision for regenerating community health, wealth, resilience and well-being. 

In this interview I talk with east central Illinois family farmer, David Bane, who with his wife farm a small parcel of land in southeastern Champaign county. They decided about 17 years ago that the best use for the land was to produce the highest quality meat, poultry and eggs for their family and for neighboring families.

 

David shares his journey that took him to veterinary school, academia, industrial farming and finally to his own farm where he raises animals regeneratively and with their best life in mind. 

 

David talks about how the pandemic is reshaping his business as demand skyrockets. He too believes this is a turning point for healthier farming and food and that farmers should be connecting and building community now to consider how to seize the moment.

 

We talk about the many benefits that would come to rural communities from re-establishing now dormant infrastructure and processing facilities. David points to several key barriers to scaling up regenerative farming quickly that are limiting the benefits that rural food economies could experience.

 

David believes that people are waking up to the possibilities and realizing that there has to be a better path forward for our farming and food system. What we need now are investments in people, skills, land, and capital infrastructure to give the Midwest region the boost it needs to realize these opportunities.

Please enjoy my conversation with David to learn how we can catalyze and support a regenerative farming and food system that works for everyone.

Don't forget, I’ve created a special Our Food Is Our Future Facebook Group where you can join the conversation and share your reflections, questions and ideas about creating a healthier farming and food system.

Here's to a healthier farming and food system for us all,

Food Farm Health Lab

Food Farm Health Lab builds on the Social Laboratory Movement, bringing together diverse stakeholders to explore, develop, and adapt regenerative farming and food system solutions that can be prototyped, modeled, and scaled in local communities for greater health, wealth, resilience and well-being.

©Basil's Harvest, 2020

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Email: carol.hays@ourfoodisourfuturesummit.org​​​